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Shell Path Edging

This pretty edging is worked sideways in small sections and that means that you can determine the finished length as you go along! Although it has other uses, as well, it's a wonderful edging to use as a trim on clothing. Add it to the neckline of a V-neck top, sew to the ends of sleeves or to a hemline, just to name a few.

This is based on an edging that was created by the early 1900's crochet designer, Sophie T. La Croix. She didn't name the edging but just assigned it a number so I gave it the name Shell Path. My version is slightly different. I rewrote the entire directions to be in today's crochet terms. You can see the early 1900's directions at the end of the pattern, if you would like to compare the two.

My Rewritten Directions:
In this pattern, a shell = (3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc) worked in one stitch.
Abbreviations:
ch = chain
dc = double crochet
sl st = slip stitch
Materials: Use size thread of your choice. Just to give an idea of finished width, the sample is made with size 10 thread and a US size 8 steel hook and is about 1 inch wide. If making it for an afghan edging, use yarn of same weight as you used to crochet the afghan. Just to give an idea of finished width, this edging made with worsted weight yarn, using a US size H hook, is about 3 1/4 inches wide.
Starting Chain: Chain 12.
Row 1: Skip 7 chains. (3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc) in next ch, ch 3. (There are three chains left unworked that you will be using at the end of row 3.) Turn.
Row 2: (3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc) in ch-3 space (in center of shell), skip next row below, dc in next chain space (at the edge of the row), ch 4. Turn.
Row 3: (3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc) in ch-3 space (in center of shell), ch 1, (dc, ch 1) 8 times in ch-3 space (at edge of the row), sl st in end of chain-3 that was left from the beginning chain.
Row 4: Ch 3, skip ch-1, skip dc, (sl st in next ch-1 space, ch 3) 7 times.
Row 5: (3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc) in ch-3 space (in center of shell), dc in next chain space (at the edge of the row), ch 4. Turn.
Row 6: (3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc) in ch-3 space (in center of shell), ch 4. Turn.
Row 7: (3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc) in ch-3 space (in center of shell), dc in next chain space (at the edge of the row), ch 4. Turn.
Row 8: (3 dc, ch 3, 3 dc) in ch-3 space (in center of shell), ch 1, (dc, ch 1) 8 times in ch-3 space (at edge of the row), skip the next two rows, sl st in chain-3 space (at edge of next row).
Row 9: Ch 3, skip ch-1, skip dc, (sl st in next ch-1 space, ch 3) 7 times.
Repeat: Repeat rows 5 - 9, consecutively, until you have reached length desired.
On Last Repeat: On last repeat of row 9, do not do the last chain 3. End off.

Following are Sophie's directions, exactly as written in the book Old and New Designs in Crochet Work, Vol. 2 (no date of publication in the book but definitely early 1900's. Vol. 1 was published in the year 1913). In those days, crocheters were often expected to "just know" what to do without the directions being fully spelled out. For this pattern, there were no other instructions beyond those for four rows, as given below. Try crocheting the edging, using the early 1900's directions below, if you'd like, just to see the difference between then and now.

Directions by Sophie T. La Croix in early 1900's
12 ch., tn.
1st R., sk. 7 ch., 1 sh. in sh., 3 ch., tn.
2nd R., 1 sh. in sh., 1 dc., 4 ch., tn.
3rd R. top as before, 1 ch., (1 dc., 1 ch.) 8 times, in loop of 3 ch. bet. 1st and 2nd R., 1 sl. st. in ch., tn.
4th R. 3 ch. sk. 2 st., 1 sl. st. over ch., (3 ch., sk. 1 dc., 1 sl. st. over ch.) 7, 2 ch., top as before.

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You may print out these images and instructions for your own personal use only. My rewritten instructions copyright 2001 by Sandi Marshall. Free for your own personal use only. If others would like to have the pattern, do not give them reproduced copies or scans (which, as with all free or purchased copyrighted patterns, without the designer's written permission, would be a copyright violation, even when given free), but instead, please give them the URL of this page, so that they may come here for themselves. Thank you. Copyright Myths Explained, U.S. Government Copyright Office - http://www.copyright.gov

Old and New Designs in Crochet Work, Vol. 2 had no date of publication in the book but definitely early 1900's. (Vol. 1 was published in the year 1913 and Sophie T. La Croix published 16 volumes.) This places the book as old enough to now be in the public domain.
How Long Does Copyright Last?
Note: Just FYI, a person can't rewrite another designer's pattern that's currently under copyright protection and then claim any copyright to his/her rewritten directions. When an antique (first published in the USA in the year 1923 or earlier) pattern has fallen into the public domain, then new copyright may be applied to variations created of those public domain patterns. Take special notice: That only applies to public domain patterns.

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