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Treble Crochet Fingerless Gloves -- Free Beginner Pattern

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Related Resources: Free Crochet Patterns for Fingerless Gloves | Crochet Accessories | Free Beginner Crochet Patterns | Easy Crochet Patterns | Crochet Patterns by Amy Solovay

This pattern was designed to give beginning crocheters an easy project to work on while learning the treble crochet stitch. However, the pattern might also prove to be of interest to crocheters of all skill levels; it could be useful for anyone who wants a quick, no-fuss pair of fingerless gloves to wear, or to give as a gift. These gloves also make quick charity crochet projects for those who like to donate their work to help others.

 

Beginner-Friendly Fingerless Gloves Featuring Treble Crochet Stitch
Beginner-Friendly Fingerless Gloves Featuring Treble Crochet Stitch. Photo © Michael Solovay.

Skill Level: Beginner


Glove Size Pictured: The gloves are shown in size teen / extra small, and they are worn by a person with a hand measurement of about 6 3/4 inches in circumference.

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern:

You can scroll down the page for more project photos, including another picture of the finished gloves plus many work-in-progress pictures.

Materials:

You'll need yarn, a crochet hook, and a tapestry needle to crochet these gloves.

Yarn:

I used Bernat Softee baby yarn to crochet my sample gloves. This yarn is a number "3" on the Craft Yarn Council's yarn weight system. Alternative names for this weight are"DK," "double knitting," or "light worsted."

Yarn Amounts Needed:

For all sizes of these gloves, one 5.00 oz / 140 g ball of Bernat Softee [Length: 362 yd / 331 m] is more than sufficient. I used about 12 grams to make one pair of gloves in the teen / adult small size. If you want to substitute another yarn, you'll need an estimated 29 meters / 32 yards of a similar yarn for the smallest size, more for the larger sizes. Please note that this is only an estimate, and be sure to allow plenty of yarn to avoid running out.

Crochet Hook:

I used a size G / 6 -- 4.25 mm crochet hook to make the sample gloves.

Tapestry Needle or Yarn Needle: You'll need a needle with an eye that's large enough to thread your yarn through. I recommend using one of these for stitching the side seams closed when you finish your fingerless gloves. The needle will also be helpful for weaving your ends in. You might also find that a needle threader is handy to have, although it isn't a necessity.

Stitch Gauge: To check your stitch gauge, crochet several rows of the pattern and then measure the width of the piece. To match my gauge exactly, you want your piece to measure 7 inches. This is the correct measurement for all glove sizes.

Row Gauge: Each row in my sample gloves measures about 7/8 of an inch. It isn't strictly necessary for you to match this gauge precisely. You can work at whatever row gauge is comfortable for you; simply stop crocheting when your piece measures about the same as the circumference of your hand (or the hand of the intended wearer.)

Glove Sizes:

To determine which size gloves you want to make, measure the circumference around your hand (or the hand of the intended wearer) at the widest point above the thumb but below the finger.

If you are using a stretchy or resilient yarn such as wool, you may wish to make your gloves a smaller size than your actual hand measurement; the yarn will stretch enough to make a comfortable fit. If you are using an inelastic yarn that does not stretch much, it's better to make the gloves a size that's closest to your actual hand measurement.

Note that these sizes DO NOT necessarily correspond to the clothing size you normally wear.

  • Teen Size / Adult Size Extra Small: If you match the gauge given, your crocheted piece will be 7 inches wide and 6 1/8 inches tall before finishing. Finished glove circumference will be about 6 1/8 inches around.


  • Adult Size Small / Medium: If you match the gauge given, your crocheted piece will be 7 inches wide and 7 inches tall before finishing. Finished glove circumference will be about 7 inches around.


  • Adult Size Medium / Large: If you match the gauge given, your crocheted piece will be 7 inches wide and 7 7/8 inches tall before finishing. Finished glove circumference will be about 7 7/8 inches around.
  • If You Need a Different Size: For longer gloves, you can make your starting chain longer; for shorter gloves, you can make your starting chain shorter. If you'd like tighter-fitting gloves, work fewer rows of treble crochet. If you'd like looser fitting gloves, work more rows of treble crochet.

What Happens If You Don't Match My Gauge?

If your glove is a bit different than my specified measurements but despite that it seems like it will fit the intended wearer just fine, there's no need to start over -- assuming you have plenty of yarn.

  • If your glove is turning out significantly narrower than 7 inches, it means that you'll end up with gloves that are shorter than 7 inches long. This might or might not be a problem. It won't be a problem if the gloves turn out to be a wearable size; it's only a problem if they're too short to be wearable. If they look like they'll be too short to wear, there are two different ways you could troubleshoot the problem. One option is to start over with a larger crochet hook. The other option is to start over and crochet a longer starting chain.

  • If your glove is turning out to be significantly wider than 7 inches, there are a couple of different potential issues you could run into. Issue #1: You'll end up with gloves that are longer than 7 inches. This is only a problem if you don't want long gloves. If it looks like your gloves would turn out longer than you want them to, there are two different ways you could troubleshoot the problem. The first would be to start over with a smaller crochet hook. The second would be to start over and crochet a shorter starting chain at the beginning. Issue #2: You're going to need more yarn than specified in the pattern. If you have plenty of yarn, no need to worry. Otherwise, start over; you don't want to run out of yarn before you finish your gloves.


  • If your treble crochet stitches are taller than 7/8 inch each, your gloves will end up fitting more loosely than my sample gloves do. Also, you might need more yarn than specified in the pattern. To troubleshoot this, you could either crochet a little tighter, or you could start over with a smaller crochet hook.


  • If your treble crochet stitches are shorter than 7/8 inch each, your gloves will end up fitting tighter than my sample gloves do. This might not be a problem, depending on what your actual hand measurement is. If it's going to be a problem, there are several different ways you could fix it. One would be to crochet an extra row of treble crochet stitches. The other would be to start over with a larger crochet hook (or a different brand of crochet hook) to see if you can't match my gauge more closely.

See Also: How your choice of crochet hooks might influence your gauge.

How to Crochet the Fingerless Gloves:

Ch 26.

Row 1: tr in 4th ch from hook and in ea st afterwards across the row. Ch 3, turn.

Row 2: Work 1 tr in ea st across the row. Ch 3, turn.

For Teen Size / Adult Size Extra Small: Rep row 2 until piece measures approx. 6 1/8 inches or desired size; if you work at the same row gauge I did, you'll end up with 7 rows total to achieve this measurement.

For Adult Size Small / Medium: Rep row 2 until piece measures approx 7 inches. If you work at the same row gauge I did, you'll end up with 8 rows total to achieve this measurement.

For Adult Size Medium / Large: Rep row 2 until piece measures approx 7 7/8 inches. If you work at the same row gauge I did, you'll end up with 9 rows total to achieve this measurement.

Check the Fit: Before finishing the gloves, it's helpful to do a quick fitting. You can put a safety pin in your active loop and then pin the sides of the glove together and see how it fits around the hand of the intended wearer. Is it comfortable? Too tight? Too loose?

If it's comfortable, it's time to finish the gloves. If the fit is too tight, crochet another row (or as many rows as it takes) until the fit is comfortable. If the fit is too loose, you can carefully unravel a row of stitches.

Finishing the Fingerless Gloves

When you are satisfied with the fit, end off, leaving a tail of about 12 inches of yarn, which you will use for stitching the side seams of your gloves.

If you would like to block your gloves, now is the time to do it. Blocking isn't necessary, but it's a nice touch if you used wool yarn, especially if you plan to give these as a gift to a friend.

 

Thread a Needle With Your Long Tail of Yarn
Thread a Needle With Your Long Tail of Yarn -- Photo © Michael Solovay

You'll use whip stitch to sew the side seam of your gloves. Thread your tapestry needle using your 12-inch tail of yarn.

 

Photo © Michael Solovay

You crocheted each piece in horizontal rows...

 

Photo © Michael Solovay

... but when you actually wear the finished gloves, they'll more or less be facing in the vertical direction.

Once you wrap your head around what's going on here, the finishing is really easy to do -- but it takes most people some time to figure it out and reach the "ah-hah!" moment for understanding the finishing process. If you don't "get it" immediately, please don't worry. You will! Just study the direction in which the stitches are going in each of these photos (remember, you can click to enlarge the pictures.) Then study the direction the stitches are going on your own gloves.

In the photo posted at above left, you can see my crochet hook with my live loop still on the hook. My hook is at the top left-hand side of my crocheted piece.

The photo at left is the exact same picture, just rotated. In this photo, you can easily visualize where the side seam on this glove will be; what used to be the top and bottom of the piece (with the piece rotated to face this direction, it's now the sides) will be folded together to create the side seam. So, to put it another way, where you see my crochet hook, the side seam will be down that edge.

So that's the direction you want everything to be going when you wear the gloves. But, for most people, it's going to be awkward to hold the gloves in that position when you do the sewing to finish them.

 

Photo © Michael Solovay

When you do your sewing, you're going to start with your crocheted rectangle in more or less the same position it was when you're crocheting it; then you're going to fold the piece in half so that the top and bottom of the piece are touching each other.

The goal here is to sew the side seams leaving an opening that's large enough for your thumb.

 

Whipstitch Your Side Seams.
Whipstitch Your Side Seams. Photo © Michael Solovay.

Begin whip stitching in the corner; if you're right-handed, it will be the upper right-hand corner as pictured; you'll stitch from right to left. If you're left-handed, you'll probably find it easier to start in the upper left-hand corner instead; you'll stitch from left to right.

If you're not already familiar with the whip stitch, you may wish to view my free whip stitch tutorial to see detailed instructions for the actual stitch.

 

Photo © Michael Solovay.

On my sample gloves, I began by whipstitching for 2 inches.

 

Reinforce the Thumb Opening With Several Stitches.
Reinforce the Thumb Opening With Several Stitches. Photo © Michael Solovay.

Then I reinforced the thumb opening by sewing through the same stitch several times. I recommend doing this because the thumb opening is likely to see a lot of wear and tear.

 

Stitch Along One Side Only for the Thumb Opening.
Stitch Along One Side Only for the Thumb Opening. Photo © Michael Solovay.

To create the thumb opening, you continue whip stitching in the same direction across the piece, but you stitch through only one side. On my sample gloves, the thumb opening measures 2 1/2 inches.

 

Photo © Michael Solovay.

At the other end of the thumb opening, sew a few more stitches in the same spot for more reinforcement.

Then continue whip-stitching through both layers to complete the gloves. On my sample gloves, this final measurement is about 2 1/2 inches.

Feel free to use these measurements as a guideline if you like, but please don't feel obligated to follow them precisely. I encourage you to measure your own hands before sewing your seams, because you might achieve a more comfortable fit using slightly different seam measurements.

Repeat these steps again to finish the other glove. Make sure they match each other before you weave your ends in!

When you are finished sewing, and you're sure that the gloves both match each other, weave the remainder of your ends into the work so that they cannot be seen.

 

The Finished Fingerless Gloves.
The Finished Fingerless Gloves. Photo © Michael Solovay.

The gloves are now ready for you to wear, or to give to their new owner.

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