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Offset Shell Prayer Shawl

Crochet pattern by Sandi Marshall

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Offset Shell Prayer Shawl pattern by Sandi Marshall
Photo © Sandi Marshall. Licensed to About.com, Inc

This shawl is in a long rectangular shape, commonly called a prayer shawl style. Three lines of my variation of offset shells run along the crocheted shawl. The photo shows only a portion of the shawl, enough for you to see how the design looks. There are links to help photos for crocheting my variation of the traditional offset shell stitch.

Abbreviations: ch = chain, chs = chains, dc = double crochet, ea = each, sc = single crochet, sp = space, st = stitch, sts = stitches

Materials: about 17 oz. any worsted weight yarn (actual amount depends on the finished length that you decide on), US size H hook

Pattern Notes: Finished width is 16 1/2 inches wide with one outside finishing round made in single crochet. The finished length is up to you. Prayer shawls are commonly anywhere from 65 inches to 80 inches in length.

To see a close look at where the stitches are made for the Offset Shell part of this pattern, see Row 1 Close Look Photo and Row 2 Close Look Photo.

Starting Chain: Leaving a length to weave in later, chain 56.
Row 1: dc in 4th ch from hook, dc in ea of next 7 chs, * skip 2 chs, (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) all in next ch, ch 2, skip next 3 chs, dc in ea of next 9 chs **, repeat the directions between * and ** 2 more times.

Row 2: ch 3 (counts as first dc), dc in ea of next 8 dc, * skip next ch-2, (2 dc, ch 1, 2 dc) all in next dc, ch 2, skip next dc, skip next ch-1, skip next 2 dc, dc in ea of next 9 dc **, repeat the directions between * and ** 2 more times.
Row 2 Note for Beginners: Be careful not to miss crocheting into the last dc of the row, which is the chain-3 that started the previous row and can be easy to miss. If unsure, simply count to see if you have 9 dc made after the last Offset Shell of the row. If you're only making 8 dc at the end, you've missed crocheting into the chain-3 which counts as the last dc of the row.

Additional Rows: Repeat Row 2 until the shawl is about three-fourths of an inch away from being as long as you want it to be (prayer shawls are commonly anywhere from 65 inches to 80 inches in length), then follow the directions for the Last Row and the Outside Finishing Round.

Last Row: ch 3 (counts as first dc), dc in ea of next 8 dc, * ch 2, skip next dc, sc in next dc, sc in next ch-1 sp, sc in next dc, ch 1, skip next dc, dc in ea of next 9 dc **, repeat the directions between * and ** 2 more times.

Outside Finishing Round: ch 1, then (working down the side of the piece), make 2 sc around post of ea dc along the side, ch 2 for corner, sc in remaining loop of each starting ch along bottom side, ch 2 for next corner, 2 sc around ea dc post on that side, ch 2 for corner, then work across the top with an sc in ea of first 9 dc, * 2 sc in ch-2 sp, sc in ea of next 3 sc, sc in ch-1 sp, sc in ea of next 9 dc **, repeat the directions between * and ** 2 more times, then ch 2 for corner, ending with a slip stitch in the first sc of this outside round.
If desired, add an edging of your choice to each short edge of the shawl. Another option is to add fringe to each short edge of the shawl. How to Add Fringe Strands (scroll down that page for photo), How to do Chain Fringe, Tied in Overlapping Pattern
End off, leaving a length to weave in. Weave in ends securely, weaving back and forth several times on the back of the cloth, working under back part of a number of stitches so that the ends will not unravel over time.

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