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Solid Shell Towel Topper Crochet Pattern

Designed by and Directions Written by Sandi Marshall

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Towel Topper pattern designed by Sandi Marshall
Photo © Sandi Marshall. Licensed to About.com, Inc

Abbreviations: ch = chain, ea = each, dc = double crochet, emb. = embroidery, sc = single crochet, sc dec = single crochet decrease, sp = space

Materials: about 1 oz. any worsted weight yarn, US size H hook
Shaping Technique:
sc dec over next 2 stitches - Instructions link, with photos: sc decrease how-to

How to do Embroidery Chain Stitches: How-to Photos

How to Crochet Through the Embroidery Chains: How-to Photos

Pattern Note: You will turn at the end of each row. If you display on the Internet your own photo of a towel topper you made from my pattern, please be kind and include a link to this free pattern so that others may come to my site to get this pattern for themselves and benefit from the many other pages of free crochet tutorials and patterns that this site has to offer. Thank you.
To begin: Fold the towel in half, with the two shorter edges lined up (the top and the bottom of the towel). Mark the center with sewing pins or with a disappearing ink fabric marker, if necessary (unless the design of the towel already provides a way to see a straight line across the center). Using this as a guideline, do a row of embroidery chain stitches across the center line (this will be used to attach the crocheting to the towel). In the example, I made 42 emb. chain stitches across the center by making each emb. chain about 1/4 inch long and by counting chains already made with I was more than halfway across, to adjust the length of the remaining chains, as needed, to result in 42 chains total.
If you have another favorite method for attaching crochet stitches to fabric, you might want to use your own favorite method instead. I've grown fond of the embroidery chain method myself, as a way to attach crochet to fabric. It's sturdy and I like the way it looks when the first row is crocheted through the emb. chain stitches.
If you prefer to use the method of poking holes in the towel in order to crochet the first row directly into the towel, make 21 sc across (or do a foundation row of 42 sc across then do a row of sc decreases, with each decrease made over each 2 sc), to result in 21 sc ... then continue with the row 2 instructions.

Row 1: Attach yarn around the first embroidery chain stitch. Draw the yarn through under the chain stitch, make a chain-1, draw the yarn through under the same chain stitch, draw the yarn through under the next chain stitch, yarn over the hook, draw yarn through all loops on the hook (one single crochet decrease made over two embroidery chain stitches). Continue in this same manner to make a single crochet decrease over each two emb. chain stitches across the row. If you made 42 emb. chain stitches across, then the decreases will come out even. If you had fewer (or more) than 42 emb. chain stitches made for the beginning, you can still make this come out to 21 sc in Row 1, by making a single crochet in just one emb. chain stitch as many times as needed (if you had fewer than 42 chains) or by drawing the yarn through 2 chains but also through a 3rd chain when beginning a decrease (to decrease one extra emb. chain in that decrease) then completing as a single crochet (if you have more than 42 chains to work into). When you finish, you should have 21 sc in row 1.
Row 2: ch 1 (to turn), sc in the first sc, * skip next sc, 5 dc all in next sc, skip next sc, sc in next sc **, repeat the directions between * and ** 4 more times.
Row 3: ch 3 (counts as first dc), dc in same place as ch-3 just made, * skip next 2 dc, sc in next dc, skip next 2 dc, 5 dc all in next sc **, repeat the directions between * and ** 3 more times, then skip next 2 dc, sc in next dc, skip next 2 dc, 2 dc in last sc.
Row 4: ch 3 (counts as first dc), dc in same place as ch-3 just made, skip next dc, skip next sc, * skip next 2 dc, sc in next dc, skip next 2 dc, 5 dc all in next sc **, repeat the directions between * and ** 2 more times, then skip next 2 dc, sc in next dc, skip next 2 dc, skip next sc, skip next dc, 2 dc in last dc.
Row 5: ch 3 (counts as first dc), dc in same place as ch-3 just made, skip next dc, dc in next sc, * skip next 2 dc, sc in next dc, skip next 2 dc, 5 dc all in next sc **, repeat the directions between * and ** once more, then skip next 2 dc, sc in next dc, skip next 2 dc, dc in next dc, skip next dc, 2 dc in last dc.
Row 6: ch 3 (counts as first dc), dc in same place as ch-3 just made, skip next 2 dc, dc in next sc, skip next 2 dc, sc in next dc, skip next 2 dc, 5 dc all in next sc, skip next 2 dc, sc in next dc, skip next 2 dc, dc in next sc, skip next 2 dc, 2 dc in last dc.
Row 7: ch 3 (counts as first dc), dc in next dc, skip next dc, dc in next sc, skip next 2 dc, sc in next dc, skip next 2 dc, dc in next sc, skip next dc, dc in next dc, dc in last dc.
Row 8: ch 1, sc in first dc, sc in ea of next 2 dc, sc in next sc, sc in ea of last 3 dc.
Rows 9 - 27: ch 1, sc in ea sc across. (7 sc)
Row 28: ch 1, sc dec over first 2 sc, chain 3, skip next 3 sc (to make a buttonhole opening), sc dec over last 2 dc. (5 sc)
Row 29: ch 1, sc in first sc, 3 sc in chain-3 space, sc in last sc.
End off, leaving a strand for weaving in. Weave in the ends, to secure.

Button: On the right side of the piece, sew a button over the center of row 10. Fold the top part forward and push the button through the buttonhole (the flap formed by this can be used to attach the towel topper to a drawer handle or refrigerator door handle or so forth).

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