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Easy Infinity Scarf Pattern

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Project Description

Easy Infinity Scarf
Easy Infinity Scarf. Click for Close-Up Photos. Photos © Michael Solovay. All Rights Reserved.

An "infinity scarf" is a bit different than a traditional scarf. Instead of being a long rectangle of fabric that's tied around the neck, an infinity scarf loops around your neck, circling around and around forever...until infinity, so to speak.

Pictured here, you can see a few different views of the first sample scarf I made using this crochet pattern. View A shows my favorite way of wearing this scarf. It's just casually looped twice around my neck. View B gives you a better look at the actual shape and length of the scarf when it's not all looped up onto itself. View C (posted below) shows a close-up of how the stitches look.

To my way of thinking, an infinity scarf has definite advantages over a traditional scarf. It's nice not having to worry about how you tie your scarf. It's also lovely to just loop the scarf around your neck and be off, without having to fuss over the thing. It's also nice not having to worry about your scarf coming untied.

 

This Is How the Infinity Scarf Looks Close Up.
This Is How the Infinity Scarf Looks Close Up. Photo © Michael Solovay. All Rights Reserved.

Another advantage: the infinity scarf has been the hottest new fashion trend of late. So, not only is it easy to wear, it's stylish too.

If you want to make your own infinity scarf, it's easy to do. Just grab a crochet hook and some yarn, and give this free pattern a try. If you already know the basics of how to crochet, you're set; you don't need to do anything fancy for this design, and you'll just need to know basic stitches.

If you don't already know how to crochet, we'll teach you how to do it, for free. You're invited to sign up for our free online crochet class, or if a class isn't your style, you might wish to work your way through our comprehensive page about how to crochet.

Skill Level: Easy

Materials and Supplies Needed:

Yarn: To crochet the sample scarf, I used 2 246 yard / 100 gram skeins of "Bare Swish DK Yarn," which is a lovely washable merino wool yarn by Knitpicks. If you want more information about this yarn, you can visit the manufacturer's website. Note that many different yarns could work well in this pattern, so feel free to substitute any similar yarn.

Crochet Hook: I used a size I /5.5 mm crochet hook to make the sample scarf. Use this hook or whichever hook you need to achieve the correct gauge.

Other: Tapestry needle for weaving in ends

Gauge and Finished Scarf Size:

My finished scarf measures approximately 61 inches in circumference. When laid flat with one half on top of the other, its approximate measurement is 30.5 inches. It measures about 7.5 inches high.

To achieve this measurement, I worked at a gauge of 19 stitches = 5 inches. This breaks down to being a bit less than 4 stitches an inch (I calculated 3.8 stitches per inch.)

Stitch gauge is important in this pattern; row gauge is not as critical for success.

It's important to take the time for checking your gauge. This will help to ensure that your scarf will turn out the right size.

On the other hand, there are many different sizes that would work well for this particular style of scarf. While I do like the size I've chosen to make my project sample, I think I'd be even happier with a slightly shorter scarf. Maybe you would be as well. Please do take your own personal preferences into consideration when you measure your work and check your gauge. The two main concerns here are achieving sizing that you'd be happy with, and at the same time, not running out of yarn. If you want to make your scarf shorter / smaller, running out of yarn would not be such a pressing concern, so matching my gauge precisely would not be critical in that case. It would be of greater concern if you want to make your scarf larger than my sample. In that case, you may wish to consider purchasing additional yarn, just to make sure you're covered.

Abbreviations Used in This Pattern:

Design Notes

Your starting chain length can be adjusted if you like. If you would like more loops or longer loops around your neck, go with a longer starting chain. You can also make the scarf shorter if you prefer. In that case, use a shorter starting chain. If you make adjustments, your starting chain should be a number of stitches that's divisible by both 6 and 4. For example, 216 chains works, and so does 240 chains.

How to Crochet the Infinity Scarf:

Ch 228. sl st to join the end of the chain to the beg, being careful to keep the chain straight. Do not allow it to twist.

Round 1: ch 1. Work 1 sc in ea ch around for a total of 228 sc. Sl st to join the work to the first sc st in the round.

Round 2: ch 3. This counts as the first dc in the round. Dc in next st, [ch 2, skip next 2 chs, work 1 dc in ea of the next 2 dc.] rep the sequence in brackets all the way around. Sl st to join the end of the round to the beg. You’ll end up with a total of 114 dc sts and 57 ch-2 spaces in the round.

Round 3: ch 1. Work sc all the way around as follows: work 1 sc in ea dc and 2 sc in ea ch-2 sp. Sl st to join the end of the round to the beg. You’ll end up with a total of 228 sc sts in the round.

Round 4: ch 3. This counts as 1 hdc plus 1 ch. Skip next st, [hdc in next st, ch 1.] Rep the sequence in brackets all the way around. Sl st to join the work to the second ch st in the round. You’ll end up with a total of 114 hdc sts and 114 ch-1 spaces in the round.

Round 5: sl st in next ch-2 sp, ch 3. This counts as 1 hdc and 1 ch. [hdc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1.] Rep the sequence in brackets all the way around. Sl st to join to the second ch st in the round.

Rounds 6-14: Rep round 5. If you want to adjust the height of your scarf, this is the best place to do it. For a skinnier scarf, you could omit one or more of these rows. For a fatter scarf, you could rep round 5 even more times than I've suggested in the pattern.

Round 15: sl st in next ch-2 sp. Then work sc all the way around as follows: ch 1, [sc in ch-1 sp, sc in next hdc.] Rep the sequence in brackets all the way around.

Round 16: Rep round 2.

Round 17: Rep round 3.

The Shell Stitch Edging on the Infinity Scarf:

Begin with your crochet hook in the active loop. [Skip the next 2 sts. In the next st, work a shell as follows: dc, ch 1, dc, ch 1, dc, ch 1, dc, ch 1, dc. Then skip the next 2 chs. Sl st in next st.] Rep the sequence in brackets all the way around. You should end up with 38 shells total.

Next Round: When you are finished working the round of shell sts, work a round of surface crochet slip stitches all the way around. The first time you work this round, you’ll want to work the surface crochet in the spot where the last round, round 17, touches the shell stitch edging round. On the other side, you’ll want to work this round in the spot where round 1 touches the shell stitch edging round.

Rep these two edging rounds on the other side, working back across the free loops in your starting chain. To get your work started, you will need to create an active loop. There are different ways you could do this, but I did it on my project by inserting my hook into one of the free loops in the starting chain, and pulling up a loop, leaving an extra long tail of yarn to weave in.

Finishing:

Weave in all loose ends. Block if desired.

More Free Crochet Scarf Patterns

Crocheted Scarves Designed by Amy Solovay.
Crocheted Scarves Designed by Amy Solovay. Photos © Michael and Amy Solovay.

You'll find bunches more free scarf patterns available on our website. Whether you want a trendy scarf that creates a fashion statement, or a classic design -- either way, we have free patterns that would be suitable.

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More Free Patterns by This Designer

Crochet Jewelry Patterns
Crochet Jewelry -- Photos and Free Patterns © Amy Solovay

Amy Solovay has designed bunches of free crochet patterns for jewelry, accessories, home decor items, granny squares, and other projects. You're invited to browse through more crochet patterns, and grab whichever ones you'd like to add to your pattern stash. Feel free to load up!

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